TIMES SQUARE ANGEL: Another Christmas Miracle

TIMES SQUARE ANGEL: A Hard-Boiled Holiday Fantasy

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

Richmond Triangle Players

At: The Robert B Moss Theatre, 1300 Altamont Avenue, RVA 23230

Performances: November 13 – December 21, 2019.

Ticket Prices: $10-35

Info: (804) 346-8113 or rtriangle.org

In the Richmond Triangle Players’ annual tradition of presenting a non-traditional holiday play, Charles Busch’s Times Square Angel, first produced by RTP in 1998, is running through December 21. Busch himself recorded the voice of the unseen narrator, and while we’re talking about unseen actors, Susan Sanford is the voice of God.

There is little or nothing traditional about Times Square Angel. Set in New York in the 1940s – complete with projections of vintage video, Times Square Angel recalls and parodies such Christmas classics as A Christmas Carol and It’s a Wonderful Life. The two-act play, directed by Melissa Rayford, is hilarious, and there were several notable performances among a cast in which most played multiple roles. But overall, I was disappointed that this production did not seem to hit the highs or maintain its momentum.

Desiree Dabney and Mara Barrett played two irreverent and gossipy angels, and Dabney quickly won over the audience with her wide range of facial expressions and her sassy demeanor. Michael Hawke was luminous as Helen Sterhan, a former star who has fallen into an alcoholic stupor from which she may never escape. Jeff Clevenger also added some nicely timed comic moments as the owner or manager of Club Intime. Along with leading lady Wette Midler, known primarily as a local drag queen artist, Hawke’s and Midler’s characters wore the best of Alex Valentin’s costume designs, and Joel Furtick was responsible for the near flawless hair/wigs and makeup.

Irish O’Flanagan, the tough-as-nails, self-centered redheaded headliner of a second-rate club, is given a second chance at life, under the guidance of Albert a former magician and now a reluctant angel played by Jeffrey Cole. Wette Midler was strong and confident the role of Irish, the most prominent of the characters who appeared not to have been assigned on the basis of gender. For example, the newsboy Jimmy was played by Mara Barrett, and both Midler and Hawke played women.

Angel Albert guides Irish on a tour of her past, present, and future, learning along the way that he can stop time and perform other supernatural feats. Each scene is filled with clichés, one-liners, and campy wit. I laughed a lot, but I couldn’t shake the feeling that Times Square Angel is a lot like a bowl of Jell-O that hasn’t been allowed to set long enough.

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: John MacLellan

 

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Angel2
Richmond drag performer Wette Midler, stars as Irish O’Flanagan, a hard-boiled dame in need of a Christmas miracle, in Richmond Triangle Players production of Charles Busch’s play “Times Square Angel” running through Dec 21 at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre in Scott’s Addition. Back row: Nora Ogunleye, Mara Barrett, Jeff Clevenger and Jonel Jones.Tickets at http://www.rtriangle.org. Photo by John MacLellan.
Angel3
Richmond drag performer Wette Midler, stars as Irish O’Flanagan, a hard-boiled dame in need of a Christmas miracle, along with Nora Ogunleye as her confidante Peona, in Richmond Triangle Players production of Charles Busch’s play “Times Square Angel” running through Dec 21 at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre in Scott’s Addition. Tickets at http://www.rtriangle.org. Photo by John MacLellan. Thanks!
Angel1
Jeffrey Cole as Albert, an angel given one last chance to retain his place in heaven by intervening in the life of chanteuse Irish O’Flanagan, in Richmond Triangle Players production of Charles Busch’s play “Times Square Angel” running through Dec 21 at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre in Scott’s Addition. Tickets at http://www.rtriangle.org. Photo by John MacLellan.

 

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LOMBARDI: Gentlemen, This Is A Football

LOMBARDI: Winning Isn’t Everything; It’s the Only Thing!

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

At: The Firehouse Theatre, 1609 W. Broad Street, RVA 23220

Performances: November 7 & 8 previews; opening November 9 – 23, 2019

Ticket Prices: $15-$35

Info: (804) 355-2001 or firehousetheatre.org

 

“Gentlemen, this is a football.”

Vince Lombardi

Based on the book When Pride Still Mattered – A Life of Vince Lombardi (by David Maraniss), Eric Simonson’s two-act play, Lombardi is a living, breathing documentary. Set in 1965, when journalist Michael McCormick from Look Magazine is sent to write a story about the man many consider the greatest coach in football history, the fast-paced, sometimes gritty dialogue gives us a peek into the life of the man remembered as much for his pithy sayings as for his lasting impact on football.

“Winning isn’t everything; it’s the only thing.”

— Vince Lombardi

(after UCLA Bruins football coach

Henry Russell “Red” Sanders, 1950, 1953)

McCormick, played by CJ Bergin, has a central role as the reporter who spends a week with Lombardi and his wife Marie in Green Bay, Wisconsin, not long after the Lombardi’s have moved to Wisconsin where Lombardi led the Green Bay Packers to five championships in seven years. (Do not be impressed – I know nothing about football – this is general knowledge, easily available to anyone.) Bergin’s character is dedicated and enthusiastic, even in the face of getting yelled at by Lombardi on the football field. He is also a multi-faceted character, as we see how his observations and interactions with the Lombardi’s help shape his own developing career. There is an easiness and familiarity about McCormick that make him a likeable character. In a slightly drunken scene in Act 2 he won my heart – and won over the players – by quoting stats from memory. He knew something – if not everything – about every player.

“Football is like life – it requires perseverance,

self-denial, hard work, sacrifice, dedication

 and respect for authority.”

– Vince Lombardi

Marie Lombardi, played by Linda S. Beringer, is undoubtedly the most likeable member of the cast. She is a mother figure to the players, soothing and smoothing over the raw and open sore left by Lombardi’s abrasiveness. She guides McCormick, steering him to the players who can provide the most insight. Sometimes she is gentle with McCormick, and sometimes she practices tough love, fueled, perhaps, by her close friendship with the couple’s liquor cabinet. (In real life, it seems, a miscarriage led to her heavy drinking.) My favorite Marie scene is when she backs the domineering Lombardi up against a wall and make it clear she isn’t taking any crap from him. It certainly doesn’t change him, or have any lasting impact, but he listens. The two seem to have a strong, loving relationship, and Marie clearly understands her husband and knows how to communicate with him like no one else.

“The most imperfect perfect man I ever met.”

– Michael McCormick

Surprisingly, I did not focus first on the title role, perhaps because this is a true ensemble production, under the skillful direction of Scott Wichmann (billed as Head Coach rather than Director). Wichmann and his actors give us a brisk pace and some well-placed and much appreciated comedic timing that almost obscured a few places where I thought the action was dragging and the play wasn’t advancing quite fast enough for me.

“If you can accept losing, you can’t win.”

– Vince Lombardi

Vince Lombardi is played by Ken Moretti (Broadway Bound, Free Man of Color, and Bill W. and Dr. Bob) in what is perhaps the most challenging role I’ve see him in, to date. Stern-faced, he rarely smiles, he yells a lot and speaks in a bombastic manner. At the same time, he clearly loves his wife and his players. In one scene, player Dave Robinson (played by Raymond Goode) explains to McCormick – over beers and a game of pool – that yelling at them is how Lombardi shows he cares. So, yelling at McCormick and kicking him off the field probably means he really likes him.

 

“People who work together will win,

whether it be against complex football defenses,

or the problems of modern society.”

– Vince Lombardi

Moretti’s portrayal of Lombardi also makes the volatile Lombardi a sympathetic figure as we watch him succumb to the symptoms of colon cancer – a disease he ignored because he was too busy making football legends. The rest of the cast includes Arik Cullen as player Paul Hornnung and Axle J. Burtness as player Jim Taylor. Cullen’s character is the one McCormick is steered to for information approved by Lombardi. Burtness’ character seems to be always in some sort of unspecified trouble, and McCormick’s unrelenting pursuit of an interview with the character Taylor is part of the reason he gets to feel the full wrath of the mercurial Lombardi directed straight at him.

 

“Winning is habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.”

– Vince Lombardi

Goode’s character has two major scenes. One, described above, is when he provides insight into Lombardi’s yelling. The other is when he tells how Lombardi demanded that all the team members be allowed to stay in the same hotel even when traveling in the south or areas where segregation was the norm. Dave Robinson, a black football player who is now in his late seventies, played for the Green Bay Packers and the Washington Redskins. Lombardi was head coach of both teams.

“You don’t do things right once in a while.

You do things right all the time.”

– Vince Lombardi

Frank Foster designed the set – a clean and simple space dominated by two pairs of tall bookcases that do multiple duty as home, locker room, and other locales. Some tables and benches, moved by the cast members, define the scene changes. Bri Conley designed the lighting, Sheila Russ did the costume design, and Amanda Durst was vocal coach.

“Battles are won in the hearts of men.”

– Vince Lombardi

As I’ve already said, I’m not much of a football fan, but my partner, Albert is. Like many others in the audience – a full house for Saturday’s opening night – he came decked out in his football attire. In his case, it was a Redskins hoodie, and thanks to our front row seats, he got a momentary spotlight when McCormick pointed him out in the scene where he mentions Lombardi’s short tenure with the Redskins (1969, just prior to his death in 1970). Albert, who attends a lot of plays with me, was enamored of this production; it combined his newfound love of theater with his lifelong love of football (he played in high school and college). A mathematician, he likes facts and stats and that sort of thing. So, bottom line, Lombardi, which runs about 2 hours, with one intermission, is a play that appeals to people who like football, people who like biographies and documentaries, and to families. If you think you might want to attend, don’t hesitate; I heard that some shows are already selling out.

 

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: Bill Sigafoos

Lombardi 8_Axle J Burtness, Ken Moretti, Arik Cullen, photo by Bill Sigafoos
Axle Burtness, Ken Moretti, Arik Cullen
Lombardi 7_Axle J Burtness, Ken Moretti, CJ Bergin, Linda S Beringer, photo by Bill Sigafoos
Ale Burtnes, Ken Moretti, CJ Bergin, Linda S Beringer
Lombardi 4_Raymond Goode, Ken Moretti, photo by Bill Sigafoos
Raymond Goode and Ken Moretti
Lombardi 2_Arik Cullen, CJ Bergin, photo by Bill Sigafoos
Arik Cullen and CJ Bergin

 


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THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW: Do The Time Warp Again

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW: A Cult Classic

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

Richmond Triangle Players

At: The Robert B Moss Theatre, 1300 Altamont Avenue, RVA 23230

Performances: October 17-26, 2019.

Ticket Prices: $10-40 | This show sold out completely at the beginning of its limited 2-week run

Info: (804) 346-8113 or rtriangle.org

Full Disclosure: It’s hard for me to write about a show like Rocky Horror Show when I can clearly see the skill and craft, acknowledge the talent and heartfelt performances, appreciate the music and humor, but I know that this cult classic just isn’t for me.

So, first the good news: Michael Hawke, who has a long history with this show, and was, in fact The Narrator in the 2012 production at The Firehouse Theatre, has directed with unbound energy and an unerring sense of comedic timing. The plot, for Rocky Horror Show “virgins,” who have never seen the show (stage or movie version) is merely a vehicle to carry a variety of themes including gender fluidity, counterculture, and sexual liberation.

The plot revolves around a newly engaged young couple, Brad and Janet, played with touching innocence by Luke Newsome and Madeline Witmer, who get a flat tire while driving through a rainstorm to celebrate their engagement with Dr. Scott (Carlen Kernish), the science professor who introduced them. Seeking help, they find the castle of  Frank ‘N’ Furter, a transvestite scientist from Transylvania, who is hosting a party to celebrate his newest invention, a Frankenstein-ish creation named Rocky – a blond, tanned muscleman with half a brain, played with an adorable balance of humor, naivete, and monstrous posing by a buff Adam Turck, dressed only in padded golden booty-shorts –later reduced to a golden G-string – and gold boots.

There are multiple story lines involving sexual exploration, gender, and aliens of the space variety. Hawke’s dynamic direction and the hilarious cast of characters keep the audience laughing. Oh, and because the movie version has become an interactive affair, bags of approved props were available for the audience to purchase, and there was a list of rules of engagement, aka etiquette. An RTP fun bag of props included such items as a newspaper, a rubber glove, a flashlight, a party hat, a playing card, and a small bag of confetti. The program included instructions on when to use, don, or throw each item. There was also an opportunity – which many took advantage of – to join in the show’s signature dance, “The Time Warp,” a sort of line dance with instructions for the steps included in the lyrics. Kate Belleman’s choreography was energetic and even included a spunky tap dance for Anne Michelle Forbes, who played the role of Frank ‘N’ Furter groupie Columbia.

The role of Frank ‘N’ Furter was reprised by Jim Morgan, who played the same role at Barksdale Theatre, now part of Virginia Rep. Morgan was fabulous, with flawless makeup, a corset and heels. Levi Meerovich was deliciously menacing – a perfect blend of horror and comedy – as his loyal servant turned arch nemesis, Riff Raff. The Phantoms were played – mostly danced – by Jet Davidson, Michaela Nicole, Havy Nguyen, and Achille Wangam, and the ensemble was completed by Jeffrey Cole as The Narrator, Kaitlyn Tate as the Usherette who introduced the show and Riff Raff’s sister Magenta, and Carlen Kernish who played the unfortunate Eddie who met an early demise as well as the paraplegic Dr. Scott.

The musical originally opened in 1973 in London where it played successfully for over seven years, and the film version, The Rocky Horror Picture Show,  premiered in 1975 and quickly became a midnight-show cult. The book, music, and lyrics are all by Richard O’Brien. The RTP production has musical direction by Kim Fox. The music was pumping, the voices were soaring, although sometimes I could not understand the lyrics because they were screaming or got lost in the music. But at least half the audience seemed to know all the words, so it didn’t matter and certainly didn’t seem to diminish anyone’s enjoyment. “Sweet Transvestite” and “I Can Make You a Man” were standouts led by Frank ‘N’ Furter, and “Touch-A Touch-A Touch Me,” led by Janet in the second act was outstanding, but “The Time Warp” seemed to be the audience’s hands-down favorite.

Sheila Russ’ costumes were campy and fun, and enhanced by Joel Furtick’s hair and make-up, while Frank Foster’s set was simple and utilitarian. Andrew Bonniwell did the lighting, and I received a message that while Joey Luck had originally been slated to do the sound design for ROCKY it was actually done by Artistic Director Lucian Restivo with Shane Barber as the live mixer for every performance.

So, what’s my problem with it? It’s a well-designed and well-executed musical – and I like musicals. It’s popular among fans and fun for “virgins,” but it just isn’t to my taste. I never saw the movie and do not have any plans to see it, but I did see the Firehouse production in 2012 and it still hasn’t grown on me. So, I hope I have been fair in describing what I consider an excellent production – except for those times when I found the lyrics muddled – and offer kudos to the performers for singing and dancing their hearts out, but I’ll never be a part of the fan club. I felt like something of an alien myself.

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: John MacLellan

ROCKY_0404
Jim Morgan as Frank ‘N’ Furter (center) with Katlyn Tate and Levi Meerovich as Magenta and Riff Raff, along with Achille Wangam, Jet Davidson and Havy Nguyen in Richmond Triangle Players’ production of Richard O’Brien’s “The Rocky Horror Show”, running at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre through Oct 26. All performances are sold out. Photo by John MacLellan.
ROCKY_0293
Kaitlyn Tate and Levi Meerovich as Magenta and Riff Raff in Richmond Triangle Players’ production of Richard O’Brien’s “The Rocky Horror Show”, running at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre through Oct 26. All performances are sold out. Photo by John MacLellan
ROCKY_0160
Luke Newsome and Madeleine Witmer as Brad and Janet in Richmond Triangle Players’ production of Richard O’Brien’s “The Rocky Horror Show”, running at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre through Oct 26. All performances are sold out. Photo by John MacLellan.

 

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A GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE TO LOVE & MURDER: Who’s Turn to Die?

A GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE TO LOVE AND MURDER: A Musical Comedy Tour de Force!

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

At: The November Theatre Marjorie Arenstein Stage

Performances: September 27 – October 20, 2019

Ticket Prices: $36-63

Info: (804) 282-2620 or www.virginiarep.org

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder has a love triangle, dysfunctional family dynamics, people who marry for money over love, a leading man who is a serial killer, and Scott Wichmann playing 8 different characters.

Written by Robert L Freedman (book and lyrics) and Steven Lutvak (music and lyrics), based on a novel by Rod Horniman, and directed and choreographed by Kikau Alvaro, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder is a delightful musical comedy in the hands of a dynamic and talented cast.

After an opening prologue by the ensemble, dressed in elegant mourning attire – a premonition of what is to follow – the audience meets Monty Navarro, sitting at a small desk on the eve of his sentencing for murder, writing his memoirs, including a full confession of how eight members of his family mysteriously died in less that a year. Alexander Sapp plays Navarro, the son of a recently deceased washerwoman who, it turns out, is related to the D’Ysquiths, a wealthy family who made their fortune in banking and finances. In fact, Monty is eighth in line to becoming the Earl of Highhurst, and Sapp seems to have as much fun playing Monty as the audience does watching him plot and plan his way to success, with time out to for romance. Never mind that his love interest, Sibella Hallward, decides to marry someone else. Grey Garrett’s portrayal of the vain and materialistic Sibella is spot on – a perfect balance of comedy and musical theater diva.

Debra Wagoner, as the mysterious Marietta Shingle, has a couple of surprises that are integral to the plot. She is supported by an ensemble that includes Georgia Rogers Farmer, Maxwell Porterfield, Daniel Pippert, Adrienne Eller, Lauren Leinhaus-Cook, Theodore Sapp, and Derrick Jaques.

 

No, I did not forget to mention Scott Wichmann. This is one of those awkward situations in which the most memorable character is not the leading man, but a supporting character – in this case eight supporting characters, all played by Wichmann. It’s not even fair to call Wichmann a supporting character, as he portrayed all the D’Ysquith heirs in line for the title Earl of Highhurst – including an inebriated cleric, a body-building lord mayor, and a country squire who is married but seems to prefer the companionship of men.

There’s Lady Hyacinth, whose interest in helping the poor and disadvantaged provides a perfect opening to send her off to her death in poverty stricken Egypt or serving the lepers in India. Surviving these dangerous missions, Monty sends her off to deepest, darkest Africa to work with a tribe of cannibals. (It’s 1909, and no one had yet been warned to be politically correct or culturally sensitive.) Lady Salome D’Ysquith Pumphrey is such a bad actress that when Monty replaces the blanks in her prop gun with real bullets and she shoots herself on stage, the audience applauds her death, perhaps not realizing she has really died. Both Lady Hyacinth and Lady Salome are played by Wichmann. Each character has a different voice, posture, and gait. The Reverend Lord Ezekial D’Ysquith, for example, has a distinctive, stylized teetering walk.

Each also has a distinct style of dressing, thanks to costume designer Sue Griffin. Visually, the production is also enhanced by Chris Raintree’s expansive set, characterized by multiple movable set components (ranging from Monty’s modest home to Lord Adalbert D’Ysquith’s mansion – an expansive mansion so grand that it offers tours to tourists.

Sandy Dacus’ music direction, along with Alvaro’s direction kept things moving along at a fair clip, although there were a few moments when I thought something should have been tightened up. The first act lasts nearly 90 minutes, with a total run time of about 2 ½ hours. For the most part, the musical selections do not cater to foot-tapping show tunes, but rather to sung narrative that advances the story line – when all the words are clear; sometimes they were not at Wednesday’s matinee.

The surprise ending brings about an unlikely alliance and opens the door to a sequel. A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Marriage is delightful musical comedy, satisfyingly delivered by a death-defying cast.

 

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: Aaron Sutten

A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder
Lauren Leinhaas-Cook, Adrienne Eller, Alexander Sapp, Grey Garrett and Scott Wichmann. Photo by Aaron Sutten.
A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder
Adrienne Eller and Alexander Sapp. Photo by Aaron Sutten.
A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder
Grey Garrett and Alexander Sapp. Photo by Aaron Sutten.
A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder
Scott Wichmann. Photo by Aaron Sutten.

 

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FALSETTOS: Who Do You Call Family?

FALSETTOS: Four Jews in a Room Bitching

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

Richmond Triangle Players

At: The Robert B Moss Theatre, 1300 Altamont Avenue, RVA 23230

Performances: September 4 – October 5, 2019.

Ticket Prices: $10 (student) – $40 (general admission)

Info: (804) 346-8113 or rtriangle.org

I knew a little – very little – about Falsettos prior to seeing the show. The Richmond Triangle Players website tells us this musical “revolves around the life of a charming, intelligent, neurotic gay man named Marvin, his wife, lover, about-to-be-Bar-Mitzvahed son, their psychiatrist, and the lesbians next door.” That description doesn’t even come close to preparing the viewer for the emotionally immersive theatrical experience that is Falsettos.

Written by William Finn (book and lyrics) and James Lapine (book), Falsettos a two-act musical that runs about 2 hours 30 minutes, with one intermission, was originally two separate one-act plays. The first, March of the Falsettos, was written in 1981. The second act, originally Falsettoland was written nearly a decade later, in 1990. The two have been knit together so seamlessly, with the first act providing introductions to the characters and fleshing out their backstories, that I cannot imagine watching the production as two separate plays.

Debra Clinton directs with a great sense of timing and an innate sense of when to turn from humor to drama. She also choreographed the show with energetic and sometimes comedic movement that is both organic and perfectly suited to actors who are not necessarily dancers. Natan Berenshteyn is the musical director, and three musicians are disappointingly but understandably offstage – unlike most musical productions at Triangle where the musicians are either onstage or at least partially visible. Jonathan Sparks’ sound design included several familiar popular songs from the 1980s and this connected with much of the audience on Friday night.

Kevin Johnson’s set was simple, versatile, and somewhat bland, with a linoleum-patterned painted floor, a trio of crates that served as furniture and props, a truncated bed that cleverly slid out from a wall, and a half-dozen empty picture frames on the walls. They were deliberately hung crooked and at significant moments they were reversed from their plain white sides to colorful sides then back again and in the final scene a seventh frame was added – and it was plumb-line straight.

Sheila Russ’s costumes looked like they came from a 1970s consignment shop, from the Richard Simms style jogging suits worn by characters Trina and Mendel to the pattern of Trina’s Act One shirt. Attention was paid to the most minute detail, such as the way Mendel’s slacks picked up one of the color’s in Trina’s shirt, and Trina’s culottes matched Mendel’s shirt. Michael Jarrett’s lighting captured it all in a golden halo of light – especially in scenes enacted on the extended runway of the stage that ran half the length of the center aisle. If I’ve omitted any elements, please understand that all the technical components worked in complete harmony and I didn’t notice any glitches.

The cast turned in all-around stellar performances – some of which were surprising for actors I’ve seen and become familiar with over the past few years. Matt Shofner, in the principal role of Marvin, developed his character with a certain amount of restraint and internal reserve that runs counter to his usually larger-than-life performances. If there was such a thing as the opposite of melodramatic, then that would be it – natural, realistic, yet intense. The gradual transformation of Marvin from an entitled, obnoxious man with a bad temper in Act One to a man aware of his own shortcomings and making strides to work on them in Act Two was remarkable.

Similarly, Dan Cimo, as Mendel, Marvin’s psychiatrist who ends up marrying Marvin’s ex-wife, showed an entirely new side of his acting chops. When I think of Dan Cimo, the first thing that comes to mind are his unnaturally wide eyes, yet here he seemed to have commanded them to assume, at least temporarily, a new, slightly subdued shape. Cimo was the strong yet sensitive man, the voice of reason and conciliation as he navigated the tenuous territory that comes with a doctor falling in love with his patient’s ex-wife and becoming step-father to his son.

Durron Marquis Tyre also turned in a touching performance as Marvin’s gay lover. His unlikely friendship with Marvin’s son, Jason, developed with remarkable subtlety and gentleness. Tyre also had a show-stopping number with “The Games I Play” near the end of Act One. Near the end of Act Two, he sings “You Gotta Die Sometimes,” and there was audible sniffing and sniveling throughout the audience. Boxes of tissues should be placed under the seats.

Two newcomers not only held their own, but nearly stole the show. Fourteen-year-old Rowan Sharma [this is a correction as I originally reported his age as 12] turned in a stunningly strong and touching performance as Marvin and Trina’s traumatized son – nearly buried under the rubble of his parent’s crumbling marriage after Marvin left Trina to seek his new identity as a gay man, while refusing to let go of his family. Casey Payne, as Trina was responsible for possibly the best and most hilarious musical number of the show with “I’m Breaking Down” in the middle of Act One. There are no spoken lines in Falsettos, every word is sung, and “I’m Breaking Down” perfectly captures the heightened emotion of a woman who finds out that her husband is gay and doesn’t know how to navigate life from there.

Shofner, Cimo, Payne, Tyre, and Sharma are joined, in Act Two, by Kelsey Cordrey and Rachel Marrs, as a lesbian couple. Cordrey, as Dr. Charlotte, enhances the dramatic content with her work on the cutting edge of New York’s AIDS epidemic, while Marrs, as her partner Cordelia, as some of the shows best comic moments as a new-age Kosher caterer whose food tastes terrible! There are few scenes that include all seven cast members, but one of those that does, “The Baseball Game” is a hilarious and touching commentary on family and the social observation that Jewish kids don’t play baseball.

In both plays, in both acts, family is the pivotal element. There is the nuclear family, and then there are the families that we choose – and the families that choose us. Sometimes they intersect and the interactions can ignite sparks or explosions. Family and love and the complexities of love are woven throughout. “Love is Blind.” There is the “Thrill of First Love.” Sometimes, “I Never Wanted to Love You.”

Falsettos is an interesting production that has been brilliantly mounted by a director and cast that seem to be perfectly matched to each other and to the show. I laughed. I cried. I was touched. I experienced theater at it was meant to be.

 

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: Photos courtesy of Phil Crosby, RTP.

FALSETTOS_0081
(clockwise from upper left) Matt Shofner, Rowan Sharma, Casey Payne, Durron Marquis Tyre and Dan Cimo in Richmond Triangle Player’s production of “Falsettos,” running now through Oct 5 at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre. http://www.rtriangle.org
FALSETTOS_0836
Matt Shofner and Durron Marquis Tyre (partially under the covers) in Richmond Triangle Player’s production of “Falsettos,” running now through Oct 5 at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre. http://www.rtriangle.org
FALSETTOS_0310
Casey Payne is “Breaking Down” in Richmond Triangle Player’s production of “Falsettos,” running now through Oct 5 at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre. http://www.rtriangle.org

 

 

Ailey

 

Whistlin’ Women

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LEVEL 4: Beating the Game

LEVEL 4: Game Over

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

At: TheatreLab, The Basement, 300 E. Broad St, RVA 23219

Performances: August 15-31, 2019

Ticket Prices: $30 general admission; $20 seniors & industry/RVATA; $10 students and teachers with ID

Info: (804) 506-3533 or theatrelabrva.org

Level 4, a smart and funny new play by Dante Piro that made its debut at TheatreLAB the basement is the second collaboration between Piro and director Chelsea Burke in as many months. (The Verge, was produced by The Firehouse and presented at The Branch Museum of Architecture and Design in July and August, https://jdldancesrva.com/2019/08/03/the-verge-good-things-come-in-small-packages). They make a great creative team.

That being said, I am entirely out of my element with Level 4, a clever and colorful play that takes us inside the world of a video game, Karma Quest, where we get to explore life, loss, loneliness, and very human characteristics and relationships as experienced by the Light Lord whose domain is a battle chamber. I am not a gamer. Since the ancient days of TRS-80, when we had to type in code line by line in order to play game, my gaming has been pretty much limited to Words with Friends, Simon’s Cats, Family Feud, and Wii Fit.. So yeah, the world of the Light Lord, Strobe, Mertens, Gauntlet, the Hero, the Heroine and Tammy is out of my league.

Nonetheless, thanks to Piro’s story – which struck a nice balance between drama and comedy – and Burke’s direction, that kept things moving along at a nice clip (the first act seemed to fly by, while the second act seemed a bit long to me), I was able to enjoy the action and laugh a lot.

The very strong and well-chosen cast consists of Chris Klinger as the likeable villain Light Lord, Adam Valentine as his loyal right hand man Strobe, Adam Turck as The Hero (a real-life human who apparently spends so much time playing the game that he eventually finds himself inside the game), Levi Meerovitch (who also seems to have been very busy working on numerous stages around RVA in the past few months) as the melancholy and introverted guardian of the armor and the giant Gauntlet hand, with Breezy Potter representing the under-represented female demographic as The Heroine and the unpopular gamer Tammy.

Interactions between Klinger and Valentine, Klinger and Turck, and Klinger and Meerovitch are especially interesting as the video game experiences glitches, the characters play the same scene over and over with various results, the game restarts, and, in the end, gets resurrected. Meerovitch and Potter sometimes appear as disembodied heads in windows on either side of Dasia Gregg’s video game set and the emotionally flat affect sometimes adopted by Valentine and Meerovitch was intriguing.

The simplicity of Gregg’s set and projections and the stylized movements of Klinger and Turck during the fight scenes suggests to this video game novice that this is a game from an earlier time period and is not one of the more modern programs. This is supported as the second act concludes with the revelation that time has passed. The Hero has married, his son is now an adult, but to tell any more would spoil the dramatic surprise of the ending.

Visually, Level 4 pulled the audience close into Gregg’s set. Lighting by Michael Jarrett included strobe effects and strands of LED lights, familiar Mario Brothers/Nintendo 64-era tunes infused the sound design by Joey Luck, and elaborate fight choreography by Emily Turner all enhanced the audience’s overall immersive experience. The one thing I thought didn’t quite fit – no pun intended – was Ruth Hedberg’s costumes. They looked somewhat like a child’s attempt to create a video game character’s garment. The Light Lord’s cape-like uniform was the most troublesome for me, closely followed by the shoe covers or spats that were simply socks with the heels and toes cut out. But the Light Lord mentioned that he had been planning to update the uniforms, so perhaps this look was intentional.

I enjoyed the intrinsic humor of the script and the pixelated quirkiness of the characters, but I am sure I missed major references and important nuances that would have been obvious to an experienced video game player. That anyone can enjoy Level 4, regardless of video experience of level, attests to the inclusiveness and universality of the subject as well as the strength of the  individual and ensemble performances.

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: Tom Topinka

Level 4.4
Chris Klinger and Adam Turck
Level 4.3
Adam Valentine, Levi Meerovitch (silhouetted), and Chris Kinger
Level 4.2
Adam Valentine
Level 4.1
Adam Turck and Chris Klinger

 

Alvin Ailey
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Whistlin Women
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AILEY: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1093389303/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=rvartreview-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=1093389303&linkId=c39a9d5181692735b3b75883d732cd03

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FOREVER PLAID: Songs & Shenanigans

FOREVER PLAID: Heavenly Harmony

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

At: Virginia Repertory Theatre at Hanover Tavern, 13181 Hanover Courthouse Road, Hanover, VA 23069

Performances: July 19 – August 25, 2019

Ticket Prices: $44

Info: (804) 282-2620 or www.virginiarep.org

Forever Plaid, the final production of the Va-Rep Hanover 2018/2019 season is a humorous heavenly harmonic hash guaranteed to make you pat your feet and smile. In the barely-there plot, a quartet of young singers on the way to a big gig at the Airport Hilton gets killed by a school bus full of Catholic high school girls (why this is important I’m not sure), on their way to watch the Beetles debut on the Ed Sullivan Show (which does become important later.) The four find themselves returning from some sort of limbo where they have spent the last 55 years for one last chance to perform in front of a big audience. The accident happened in the 1964, and one member of the quartet asks the audience what year it is. On Thursday, the audience member, perhaps flustered, initially gave a false date, in the 1950s, before admitting it was 2019.

This is not the only instance of audience participation. In another scene a compliant woman named Nora was charmed onstage to play piano with Sparky (while Travis is on his union break), and the entire audience is corralled into a sing-along on the song “Matilda.” The quartet brings instruments into the audience for those who care to participate in a hands-on experience, and Nora, by the way, left the stage with a commemorative plaid dental floss and a certificate with her name on it.

The shenanigans are carried on with amusing awkwardness – one member of the four is often out of step and depends on antacids to tame his nervous stomach, one hyperventilates, one has a mild speech impediment, and the fourth is prone to nosebleeds – by Mitchell Ashe (Sparky), PJ Llewellyn (Smudge), Ian Page (Jinx), and Caleb Wade (Frankie). Two, Jinx and Smudge, I think (it’s hard to keep up) are even step-brothers, and in one touching scene reminisce about a childhood tradition of family TV night. They watch, what else, “The Ed Sullivan Show.” The “band” consists of Travis West on piano and David Yohe on bass. They all sing well, even when making mistakes on purpose, while rotating through a veritable warehouse of wacky props, from six foot plumbers’ helpers (plungers) to straw hats and a traditional nun’s wimple.

Ashe, Llewellyn, Page, and Wade seem to have as much fun playing these characters as the audience does watching and listening to them. Wade, as the group’s leader, shows equal parts confidence and compassion, which seems even more amazing considering that the group leads off with, “We’re Forever Plaid, and we’re dead.”  My favorite part of the show, however, is when The Plaids perform the entire “Ed Sullivan Show” (that ran on CBS from 1948 – 1971) in three minutes and eleven seconds – including the animal acts, puppets, musical acts, comedians, and even Topo Gigio, the Italian mouse.

Forever Plaid, written by Stuart Ross and first performed off-Broadway in 1989, was directed by Wes Seals with musical direction by Travis West. Both keep the pace moving at just the right speed (45rpm). Terrie Powers’ set is simple – arches, silver curtains, stars, a rounded stage – and BJ Wilkinson’s lighting sets just the right tone. Marcia Miller Hailey’s white dinner jackets are simple and classy, and the long-awaited arrival of the group’s plaid tuxedo jackets doesn’t occur until near the end of the one-act show that runs just under 90 minutes. The sound design by Derek Dumais makes everything clear and easy to understand, and the choreography (no credit is given, so I assume they retained Ross’ original choreography) is charmingly corny.

There are more than a dozen songs, beginning with “Three Coins in a Fountain” and ending with “Love is a Many Splendored Thing,” the song they were rehearsing in their red Mercury convertible when they were killed. In between there is a wide variety of musical numbers, from the Caribbean medley to Sam Cooke’s “Chain Gang,” “Perfidia,” which was inspired by the quartet’s collective crush on their high school Spanish teacher, to one of my favorites, the energetic “Crazy ‘Bout Ya Baby.” There are plenty of period and time-related references that might fall flat on anyone under the age of 50, and “The Ed Sullivan Show” seems to be a unifying thread, but Forever Plaid is a joyous, feel-good musical revue that favors naivete over controversy.

 

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: Aaron Sutten

Forever Plaid
Ian Page, Mitchell Ashe, Caleb Wade, PJ Llewellyn. Photo by Aaron Sutten.
Forever Plaid
PJ Llewellyn, Mitchell Ashe, Caleb Wade, . Photo by Aaron Sutten.
Forever Plaid
Ian Page, Caleb Wade, Mitchell Ashe, PJ Llewellyn. Photo by Aaron Sutten.
Forever Plaid
Mitchell Ashe, Ian Page, Caleb Wade, PJ Llewellyn. Photo by Aaron Sutten.

 

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Whistlin Women

 

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Alvin Ailey

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