TIMES SQUARE ANGEL: Another Christmas Miracle

TIMES SQUARE ANGEL: A Hard-Boiled Holiday Fantasy

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

Richmond Triangle Players

At: The Robert B Moss Theatre, 1300 Altamont Avenue, RVA 23230

Performances: November 13 – December 21, 2019.

Ticket Prices: $10-35

Info: (804) 346-8113 or rtriangle.org

In the Richmond Triangle Players’ annual tradition of presenting a non-traditional holiday play, Charles Busch’s Times Square Angel, first produced by RTP in 1998, is running through December 21. Busch himself recorded the voice of the unseen narrator, and while we’re talking about unseen actors, Susan Sanford is the voice of God.

There is little or nothing traditional about Times Square Angel. Set in New York in the 1940s – complete with projections of vintage video, Times Square Angel recalls and parodies such Christmas classics as A Christmas Carol and It’s a Wonderful Life. The two-act play, directed by Melissa Rayford, is hilarious, and there were several notable performances among a cast in which most played multiple roles. But overall, I was disappointed that this production did not seem to hit the highs or maintain its momentum.

Desiree Dabney and Mara Barrett played two irreverent and gossipy angels, and Dabney quickly won over the audience with her wide range of facial expressions and her sassy demeanor. Michael Hawke was luminous as Helen Sterhan, a former star who has fallen into an alcoholic stupor from which she may never escape. Jeff Clevenger also added some nicely timed comic moments as the owner or manager of Club Intime. Along with leading lady Wette Midler, known primarily as a local drag queen artist, Hawke’s and Midler’s characters wore the best of Alex Valentin’s costume designs, and Joel Furtick was responsible for the near flawless hair/wigs and makeup.

Irish O’Flanagan, the tough-as-nails, self-centered redheaded headliner of a second-rate club, is given a second chance at life, under the guidance of Albert a former magician and now a reluctant angel played by Jeffrey Cole. Wette Midler was strong and confident the role of Irish, the most prominent of the characters who appeared not to have been assigned on the basis of gender. For example, the newsboy Jimmy was played by Mara Barrett, and both Midler and Hawke played women.

Angel Albert guides Irish on a tour of her past, present, and future, learning along the way that he can stop time and perform other supernatural feats. Each scene is filled with clichés, one-liners, and campy wit. I laughed a lot, but I couldn’t shake the feeling that Times Square Angel is a lot like a bowl of Jell-O that hasn’t been allowed to set long enough.

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: John MacLellan

 

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Angel2
Richmond drag performer Wette Midler, stars as Irish O’Flanagan, a hard-boiled dame in need of a Christmas miracle, in Richmond Triangle Players production of Charles Busch’s play “Times Square Angel” running through Dec 21 at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre in Scott’s Addition. Back row: Nora Ogunleye, Mara Barrett, Jeff Clevenger and Jonel Jones.Tickets at http://www.rtriangle.org. Photo by John MacLellan.
Angel3
Richmond drag performer Wette Midler, stars as Irish O’Flanagan, a hard-boiled dame in need of a Christmas miracle, along with Nora Ogunleye as her confidante Peona, in Richmond Triangle Players production of Charles Busch’s play “Times Square Angel” running through Dec 21 at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre in Scott’s Addition. Tickets at http://www.rtriangle.org. Photo by John MacLellan. Thanks!
Angel1
Jeffrey Cole as Albert, an angel given one last chance to retain his place in heaven by intervening in the life of chanteuse Irish O’Flanagan, in Richmond Triangle Players production of Charles Busch’s play “Times Square Angel” running through Dec 21 at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre in Scott’s Addition. Tickets at http://www.rtriangle.org. Photo by John MacLellan.

 

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LOMBARDI: Gentlemen, This Is A Football

LOMBARDI: Winning Isn’t Everything; It’s the Only Thing!

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

At: The Firehouse Theatre, 1609 W. Broad Street, RVA 23220

Performances: November 7 & 8 previews; opening November 9 – 23, 2019

Ticket Prices: $15-$35

Info: (804) 355-2001 or firehousetheatre.org

 

“Gentlemen, this is a football.”

Vince Lombardi

Based on the book When Pride Still Mattered – A Life of Vince Lombardi (by David Maraniss), Eric Simonson’s two-act play, Lombardi is a living, breathing documentary. Set in 1965, when journalist Michael McCormick from Look Magazine is sent to write a story about the man many consider the greatest coach in football history, the fast-paced, sometimes gritty dialogue gives us a peek into the life of the man remembered as much for his pithy sayings as for his lasting impact on football.

“Winning isn’t everything; it’s the only thing.”

— Vince Lombardi

(after UCLA Bruins football coach

Henry Russell “Red” Sanders, 1950, 1953)

McCormick, played by CJ Bergin, has a central role as the reporter who spends a week with Lombardi and his wife Marie in Green Bay, Wisconsin, not long after the Lombardi’s have moved to Wisconsin where Lombardi led the Green Bay Packers to five championships in seven years. (Do not be impressed – I know nothing about football – this is general knowledge, easily available to anyone.) Bergin’s character is dedicated and enthusiastic, even in the face of getting yelled at by Lombardi on the football field. He is also a multi-faceted character, as we see how his observations and interactions with the Lombardi’s help shape his own developing career. There is an easiness and familiarity about McCormick that make him a likeable character. In a slightly drunken scene in Act 2 he won my heart – and won over the players – by quoting stats from memory. He knew something – if not everything – about every player.

“Football is like life – it requires perseverance,

self-denial, hard work, sacrifice, dedication

 and respect for authority.”

– Vince Lombardi

Marie Lombardi, played by Linda S. Beringer, is undoubtedly the most likeable member of the cast. She is a mother figure to the players, soothing and smoothing over the raw and open sore left by Lombardi’s abrasiveness. She guides McCormick, steering him to the players who can provide the most insight. Sometimes she is gentle with McCormick, and sometimes she practices tough love, fueled, perhaps, by her close friendship with the couple’s liquor cabinet. (In real life, it seems, a miscarriage led to her heavy drinking.) My favorite Marie scene is when she backs the domineering Lombardi up against a wall and make it clear she isn’t taking any crap from him. It certainly doesn’t change him, or have any lasting impact, but he listens. The two seem to have a strong, loving relationship, and Marie clearly understands her husband and knows how to communicate with him like no one else.

“The most imperfect perfect man I ever met.”

– Michael McCormick

Surprisingly, I did not focus first on the title role, perhaps because this is a true ensemble production, under the skillful direction of Scott Wichmann (billed as Head Coach rather than Director). Wichmann and his actors give us a brisk pace and some well-placed and much appreciated comedic timing that almost obscured a few places where I thought the action was dragging and the play wasn’t advancing quite fast enough for me.

“If you can accept losing, you can’t win.”

– Vince Lombardi

Vince Lombardi is played by Ken Moretti (Broadway Bound, Free Man of Color, and Bill W. and Dr. Bob) in what is perhaps the most challenging role I’ve see him in, to date. Stern-faced, he rarely smiles, he yells a lot and speaks in a bombastic manner. At the same time, he clearly loves his wife and his players. In one scene, player Dave Robinson (played by Raymond Goode) explains to McCormick – over beers and a game of pool – that yelling at them is how Lombardi shows he cares. So, yelling at McCormick and kicking him off the field probably means he really likes him.

 

“People who work together will win,

whether it be against complex football defenses,

or the problems of modern society.”

– Vince Lombardi

Moretti’s portrayal of Lombardi also makes the volatile Lombardi a sympathetic figure as we watch him succumb to the symptoms of colon cancer – a disease he ignored because he was too busy making football legends. The rest of the cast includes Arik Cullen as player Paul Hornnung and Axle J. Burtness as player Jim Taylor. Cullen’s character is the one McCormick is steered to for information approved by Lombardi. Burtness’ character seems to be always in some sort of unspecified trouble, and McCormick’s unrelenting pursuit of an interview with the character Taylor is part of the reason he gets to feel the full wrath of the mercurial Lombardi directed straight at him.

 

“Winning is habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.”

– Vince Lombardi

Goode’s character has two major scenes. One, described above, is when he provides insight into Lombardi’s yelling. The other is when he tells how Lombardi demanded that all the team members be allowed to stay in the same hotel even when traveling in the south or areas where segregation was the norm. Dave Robinson, a black football player who is now in his late seventies, played for the Green Bay Packers and the Washington Redskins. Lombardi was head coach of both teams.

“You don’t do things right once in a while.

You do things right all the time.”

– Vince Lombardi

Frank Foster designed the set – a clean and simple space dominated by two pairs of tall bookcases that do multiple duty as home, locker room, and other locales. Some tables and benches, moved by the cast members, define the scene changes. Bri Conley designed the lighting, Sheila Russ did the costume design, and Amanda Durst was vocal coach.

“Battles are won in the hearts of men.”

– Vince Lombardi

As I’ve already said, I’m not much of a football fan, but my partner, Albert is. Like many others in the audience – a full house for Saturday’s opening night – he came decked out in his football attire. In his case, it was a Redskins hoodie, and thanks to our front row seats, he got a momentary spotlight when McCormick pointed him out in the scene where he mentions Lombardi’s short tenure with the Redskins (1969, just prior to his death in 1970). Albert, who attends a lot of plays with me, was enamored of this production; it combined his newfound love of theater with his lifelong love of football (he played in high school and college). A mathematician, he likes facts and stats and that sort of thing. So, bottom line, Lombardi, which runs about 2 hours, with one intermission, is a play that appeals to people who like football, people who like biographies and documentaries, and to families. If you think you might want to attend, don’t hesitate; I heard that some shows are already selling out.

 

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: Bill Sigafoos

Lombardi 8_Axle J Burtness, Ken Moretti, Arik Cullen, photo by Bill Sigafoos
Axle Burtness, Ken Moretti, Arik Cullen
Lombardi 7_Axle J Burtness, Ken Moretti, CJ Bergin, Linda S Beringer, photo by Bill Sigafoos
Ale Burtnes, Ken Moretti, CJ Bergin, Linda S Beringer
Lombardi 4_Raymond Goode, Ken Moretti, photo by Bill Sigafoos
Raymond Goode and Ken Moretti
Lombardi 2_Arik Cullen, CJ Bergin, photo by Bill Sigafoos
Arik Cullen and CJ Bergin

 


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RICHMOND BALLET: GRACE IN THE RIVER CITY – A REVIVAL & A PREMIERE

RICHMOND BALLET STUDIO ONE: GRACE IN THE RIVER CITY

A Dance Review by Julinda D. Lewis

At: The Richmond Ballet Studio Theatre, 407 E. Canal St., RVA 23219

Performances: November 5-10, 2019

Ticket Prices: $26-$46

Info: (804) 344-0906 x224 or etix.com

chiaroscuro
noun
chiar·oscu·ro | \kē-ˌär-əˈskyu̇r-(ˌ)ō\

  1. pictorial representation in terms of light and shade without regard to color 
  2. a: the arrangement or treatment of light and dark parts in a pictorial work of art

    b: the interplay or contrast of dissimilar qualities (as of mood or character)

merriam-webster.com

The Richmond Ballet opened its 2019-2020 season (19/20 for short) with the theme “Grace in the River City.” The Studio One program, held at the company’s Canal Street studio, included Artistic Director Stoner Winslett’s “Ancient Airs and Dances” and Ma Cong’s “Chiaroscuro.”

“Ancient Airs and Dances,” set to three suites of 17th and 18th century Italian and French lute songs by Ottorino Respighi, was revived in honor of Winslett’s 40th anniversary with the Richmond Ballet. The work for four couples was Winslett’s first work for the professional company. Dressed alike, but in different colors (navy, purple, aubergine, wine) the four couples begin with a formal promenade, tracing figures on the floor. At the end of the introductory movement, they toss away their masks and begin to reveal their separate personalities.

First is Ira White and Eri Nishihara (purple). They appear to be the playful couple, moving lightly, teasing and skipping offstage. Next up, Abi Goldstein and Anthony Oates (aubergine) who present themselves as the romantic duo. They are more dramatic, and Goldstein is very strong, demonstrating a freedom of physicality as when she rolls across Oates’ back. When Cody Beaton and Mate Szentes (navy) dance, the woman’s skirt and man’s vest have been shed and the movements seem more contemporary and exploratory, less formal, and finally Melissa Frain and Marty Davis’ (wine) dance seems to be about reconciliation and commitment or longevity as they seem to linger in one another’s presence and movements. In the final section, the four couples gather in a folk dance and each couple briefly reprises their duet before ending in a rotating figure like a carousel, with the women held aloft, parts of a whole.

During her tenure at Richmond Ballet, Winslett has commissioned more than 75 works, by more than 35 choreographers (facts she revealed during her Tuesday evening Choreographer’s Club curtain talk). For Studio One, she brought back Ma Cong for his fifth new work in ten years.

“Chiaroscuro” is a collaborative work, with choreography by Ma Cong, Music by Ezio Bosso, costumes and set by Emma Kingsbury, lighting by Trod Burns, and photography by Sara Ferguson. The nine dancers – 4 women and 5 men – move through Bosso’s music illuminated by Burns’ lighting with Ferguson’s larger-than-life black and white images of themselves projected onto Kingsbury’s set. It might be a rock, or a cliff, but wait – what is that long, thin thing sticking up out of middle of it? “Nothing’s perfect,” was Kingsbury’s enigmatic response when questioned about it.

Images change subtly; where there were hands there is now a face; where there was a face, there are now two, no three! The costumes, in shades of black and gray, echo the chiaroscuro effect  – the contrast of light and dark, the constantly shifting light and the movement of human sculptures.  Hmmm, a Chinese choreographer; an Italian composer; an Australian designer; an American ballet company – was this, too, part of Cong’s vision, or was it serendipity?

The cast – Cody Beaton, Elena Bello, Melissa Frain and Eri Nishihara, Marty Davis, Trevor Davis, Fernando Sabino, Mate Szentes, and Ira White – seemed to enjoy performing this piece as much as the audience enjoyed watching it.

“Chiaroscuro” begins with Fernando Sabino (who has announced his retirement at the end of this season) o the floor. As he rises, his movements are strong, emotive, not all lightness and grade. As the other dancers enter, the women are lifted in swirling arcs, tracing figure eights in the air. When the men arc backwards, they turn their knees inward. This ballet is not technique as usual. A diagonal line turns inward and wraps around like a spiral segment of DNA. Dancers unite and separate. Elena Belo is lifted about a cluster of men and held aloft in a running pose. Three men intertwine, heads popping out and leaping through hoops made of arms like a game of whack-a-mole.

On the screen, a large white rose emerges; but the end of the dance it has wilted. On the stage, a white parasol weaves its way across the stage. I somehow felt the rose and the parasol were connected. Partnering in “Chiaroscuro” is intriguing. In one section the women shed their skirts, becoming de-sexualized. Dancers morph into oddly intriguing positions, finding new ways to connect. One may be held by an ankle, a toe, or back of the knee. Dancers’ arms and legs become hooks from which to suspend bodies and legs and thighs become step stools leading to higher dimensions.

Like previous works by Cong, “Chiaroscuro” encourages the viewer to explore new perspectives of human emotion, as he did with “Lift the Fallen,” a 2014 work in which he deals with the loss of his mother. But “Chiaroscuro” is even more immersive, more compelling. It is a beautiful work that elevates both the dancers and those watching them.

 

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: Sarah Ferguson

 

Books available on Amazon.com; click on cover for link.

 

13: THE SECOND TIME AROUND

13, THE MUSICAL: The Second Cast; A Second Look

An Addendum to Yesterday’s Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

By: Virginia Rep/Cadence Theatre Company

At: Theatre Gym, Virginia Repertory Center, 114 W. Broad St., RVA 23220

Performances: October 26 – November 17, 2019

Ticket Prices: Single tickets start at $42

Info: (804) 282-2620 or va-rep.org

Yesterday (October 25) I wrote about 13, The Musical after seeing the first cast. Today (October 26) I returned for the second opening night with a different cast – except for, I think, two actors.

The original view may be viewed at:

https://jdldancesrva.com/2019/10/26/13-what-could-possibly-go-wrong

When Cadence Theatre’s Artistic Director Anna Senechal Johnson announced that there would be two entire casts for 13, THE MUSICAL and that there would be two opening nights, I decided to attend both. The board with the actors’ headshots had to be changed, and there were two sets of programs printed. Preparation for this musical, more than 40 performers (actors and band members ranged in age from 12 to 17) required changing the headshot board and printing two sets of programs to accommodate the two casts – the Appleton and the Indiana (named for the town and state where our young leading man must move after his parents’ divorce). It must have felt like the theater company was preparing to give birth to twins.

For the first five minutes, I started to compare the performances of the two sets of  main characters, but about 10 minutes into the show I realized that the characters had taken over. While the chemistry was different, and different actors brought their own nuances, I can honestly say that the experiences were equivalent to seeing the same show twice with the same cast.

Physically, Brandon McKinney and Evan Dymon are quite different (in stature, facial structure, and more) but both portrayed lead character Evan with naivete, bravado, and compassion. Bridget Sindelar may have had a slight edge over Violet Craighead-Way as far as vocal range or power, but both made me root for Patrice and cheer her independence and self-identity.

The differences between Donathan Arnold and Cohen Steele are even more striking than the differences between McKinney and Dymon. Arnold is tall, slender, and black while Dymon looks farm-strong and he’s white.

I think Caroline Johnson portrayed a somewhat more prissy and less conceited Kendra than did Audrey Kate Taylor, while Jolie Smith and Anjali Sharma were equally strong as the mean girl. Both were able to maintain a sneer throughout a rigorous cheerleading routine, but Sharm’s tripping of best-friend-and-arch-enemy Kendra was perhaps a tiny bit more subtle than was Jodi Smith’s action for the same scene.

Ethan Dunne Stewart and Marcus Dowd, as Brett’s friends and hangers-on were a bit more outrageous, if possible, in their role as back up singers than were Owen Buckenmaier and Jake Barger, but both pairs of hangers-on were among my favorite characters.

Since much of the story line is sung, it is important that the lyrics can be clearly heard, and from my position (second row, right on Friday night and second row, front on Saturday) there where a few times that the vocals got lost for a moment or two and I never did understand the much repeated line of the finale.

My first impression remains the same: 13, THE MUSICAL: is a fun and energetic piece of theatre that is this wholly engrossing. Both casts of teens exude energy and professionalism; they make you care about what happens to Evan, Patrice, and Kendra (the bar mitzvah boy, his new friend, and the popular girl) and their friends. As if anticipating the audience reaction, the authors have the cast sing about their growth, their decisions, their triumphs and failures over the course of the school year

 

 

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: Jay Paul

13, The Musical
Josh Chapman and Violet Craghead-Way
13, The Musical
Anjali Sharma
13, The Musical
Autumn Papczynski
13, The Musical
Evan Dymon, Brenna Duffy, and John Chapman
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13: What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

13: A Teen-aged Musical

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

By: Virginia Rep/Cadence Theatre Company

At: Theatre Gym, Virginia Repertory Center, 114 W. Broad St., RVA 23220

Performances: October 26 – November 17, 2019

Ticket Prices: Single tickets start at $42

Info: (804) 282-2620 or va-rep.org

The musical 13 with its high-energy cast of teenagers starts off at a level 10 and pretty much stays there for the duration. The first – and so far only – Broadway musical to have a cast made up entirely of teenagers, the Richmond casts of 13 ranges in age from 12-17. Yes, casts. That was not a typo. Cadence Theatre’s Artistic Director, Anna Senechal Johnson, worked with two casts that will alternate throughout the run. I assumed this was because of the youthful ages of the cast, but in speaking with Johnson after Friday’s opening night program – a second opening night will be held on Saturday for the second cast – it seems that the dual casts are also a way to fulfill the company’s mission and “commitment to development and training for young actors all over Virginia.” Indeed, several of the young actors – and their parents or guardians – commute to Richmond for this show from as far as Northern Virginia and Maryland.

Written by Jason Robert Brown (music and lyrics) and Dan Elish and Robert Horn (book), 13 chronicles several months in the life of Evan, played on Friday by Brandon McKinney. Evan is looking forward to his bar mitzvah, when he gets hit with not one but two major blows: first his parents divorce, then his mother informs him they are moving from New York City – the only hone he has ever known – to a Smalltown, USA, or Appleton, Indiana, to be precise.

Evan befriends Patrice (Bridget Sindelar) before finding out she is a social outcast, and in a heart-wrenching scene, he un-invites her to his party so that the popular kids will attend. Patrice is played by Bridget Sindelar, whom my daughter Soleil immediately recognized as Pinocchio from the VirginiaRep children’s show last season. [https://jdldancesrva.com/2019/03/31/pinocchio-bright-and-shining-son ]. Sindelar nails the character of Patrice, but more importantly, her singing is strong and here range impressive.

Evan’s action catches the attention of Patrice’s best friend, Archie (Ethan Phelps) – a classmate with an unnamed debilitating condition (muscular dystrophy, according to a synopsis of the script) that requires that he use crutches to walk. This makes him an object of ridicule to the popular kids, but that doesn’t stop him from plotting and planning to manifest his deepest fantasy. Archie has a crush on Kendra (Audrey Kate Taylor) and quickly enlists Evan to help jock-boy Brett (Donathan Arnold) secure a date with the ever-popular Kendra, with the ulterior motive of inserting himself in the role of leading man. The boys hatch a plan that at first seems successful – but if that were the case, the play would have ended here instead of continuing to its conclusion.

The lively music under the direction of Anthony Smith is played by a live band, most of whom are onstage in front of us but some of them are placed behind the audience. There is energetic choreography – 13 even included a tap dance – by Jasmine Mckenzie that is created and performed with a sense of ordered chaos that perfectly captures the teen-aged characters. A simple cinderblock set by Emily Hake Massie hides a few surprises that are revealed when doors swing out to create new spaces. Sarah Grady’s costumes are contemporary, with most of the cast – especially the ensemble – dressed in neutral shades like gray, but Evan sports a red plaid shirt, and other leading characters break out of the gray mold with bits of color.

Patrice/Sindelar is full of wisdom, but also has some of the funniest lines in the show. When introducing Evan/McKinney to the town of Appleton, she points out the highlights, like the Walmart and Dairy Queen, but also drops lines like, “The inbreeding takes up a lot of our time.”

Brett/Arnold is the cool, handsome quarterback, and is stereotypically vain and not the sharpest knife in the drawer. His buddies Eddie (Owen Buckenmaier) and Malcolm (Jake Barger) are loyal, hilarious sidekicks. When trying to help Brett prepare to ask Kendra (Audrey Kate Taylor), the prettiest girl in Dan Quail Middle School, they metamorphose into R&B backup singers. Although why the star quarterback and most popular boy on campus needs help getting a date is beyond me. Taylor plays her role with wide-eyed innocence and it’s irritating when she doesn’t seem to catch on to her friend’s betrayal.

Teen-agers can be some of the meanest people on earth, so it is no surprise that there is a Mean Girl in 13. Lucy (Jolie Smith) is supposed to be Kendra’s best friend, but she wants Brett for herself, and does everything she can to get Kendra out of the way: bullying; tripping her during cheerleader practice; giving conflicting advice about how to behave around a boy; and starting a vicious rumor. I suppose why 13 year old students are dating is irrelevant, but one scene hinges around Evan asking his mother to buy movie tickets to an R-rated movie for Evan and his popular friends. The sneer Smith wears whenever Kendra is around is so convincing I began to actively dislike Lucy.

Mia Meadows and Hannah Riggs share the lead in the closing song in a breakout surprise, after performing in the ensemble and the cheerleading squad for most of the play. Brenna Duffy stood in for Zoë Brown on Friday, taking over Zoë’s duties as Rabbi. Because of the huge size of the cast – when doubled – I will let the words of the press release fill in the missing notes:

Returning to the Cadence stage in the Appleton Cast are Violet Craghead-Way (Fun Home), Caroline Johnson (Appropriate), Grace Connell (Appropriate), and Sophia Bunnell (Violet). Returning in the Indiana Cast are Brandon McKinney (Fun Home; Caroline, or Change), Donathan Arnold (Caroline, or Change), and Alex Csaky (Fun Home). Making their Cadence debuts in the Appleton Cast are Evan Dymon, Josh Chapman, Cohen Steele, Anjali Sharma, Ethan Dunne Stewart, Marcus Dowd, Emma McClain, Autumn Papczynski, Molly Nugent, Sam Hurst, Raif Winn, Brenna Duffy, Gracie Farrell, and Lauren Brabrand. Debuting in the Indiana Cast are Bridget Sindelar, Ethan Phelps, Audrey Kate Taylor, Jolie Smith, Owen Buckenmaier, Jake Barger, Molly Rose Meredith, Mia Meadows, Bekah Blackburn, Sawyer Williams, Jack Hensley, Mia Krivanec, Zoë Brown, Madelyn Diradour, and Sarah Kathryn Makl. Performing with both casts will be Hannah Riggs and Christopher Stone. Mason Timberline will be joining the cast as the pianist/Master Conductor.

So, it appears I was led along this theatrical musical journey by the very capable Appleton cast. On Saturday I will go back to see how the Indiana cast conducts themselves along this same path, and I’ll report back to you.

13 is a lively, upbeat show tackles real-life teen-aged problems: popularity; peer pressure; bullying, and more. And every single one of the teens onstage has a cellphone in their pocket; they frequently take them out for a selfie or to record some controversy or other. There is even a one-page Study Guide included in the program that asks some interesting questions, such as “How has technology changed social expectations for adolescents?” and “What does the musical, 13, teach us about friendship and prioritizing personal relationships.

 Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: Jay Paul

13, The Musical
Cast of 13. Brandon Mckinney. Photo by Jay Paul.
13, The Musical
Cast of 13. Photo by Jay Paul.
13, The Musical
Cast of 13. Brandon McKinney. and Bridget Sindelar.Photo by Jay Paul.
13, The Musical
Cast of 13. Audrey Kate Taylor and Donathan Arnold. Photo by Jay Paul.
13, The Musical
Cast of 13. Photo by Jay Paul.
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THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW: Do The Time Warp Again

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW: A Cult Classic

A Theater Review by Julinda D. Lewis

Richmond Triangle Players

At: The Robert B Moss Theatre, 1300 Altamont Avenue, RVA 23230

Performances: October 17-26, 2019.

Ticket Prices: $10-40 | This show sold out completely at the beginning of its limited 2-week run

Info: (804) 346-8113 or rtriangle.org

Full Disclosure: It’s hard for me to write about a show like Rocky Horror Show when I can clearly see the skill and craft, acknowledge the talent and heartfelt performances, appreciate the music and humor, but I know that this cult classic just isn’t for me.

So, first the good news: Michael Hawke, who has a long history with this show, and was, in fact The Narrator in the 2012 production at The Firehouse Theatre, has directed with unbound energy and an unerring sense of comedic timing. The plot, for Rocky Horror Show “virgins,” who have never seen the show (stage or movie version) is merely a vehicle to carry a variety of themes including gender fluidity, counterculture, and sexual liberation.

The plot revolves around a newly engaged young couple, Brad and Janet, played with touching innocence by Luke Newsome and Madeline Witmer, who get a flat tire while driving through a rainstorm to celebrate their engagement with Dr. Scott (Carlen Kernish), the science professor who introduced them. Seeking help, they find the castle of  Frank ‘N’ Furter, a transvestite scientist from Transylvania, who is hosting a party to celebrate his newest invention, a Frankenstein-ish creation named Rocky – a blond, tanned muscleman with half a brain, played with an adorable balance of humor, naivete, and monstrous posing by a buff Adam Turck, dressed only in padded golden booty-shorts –later reduced to a golden G-string – and gold boots.

There are multiple story lines involving sexual exploration, gender, and aliens of the space variety. Hawke’s dynamic direction and the hilarious cast of characters keep the audience laughing. Oh, and because the movie version has become an interactive affair, bags of approved props were available for the audience to purchase, and there was a list of rules of engagement, aka etiquette. An RTP fun bag of props included such items as a newspaper, a rubber glove, a flashlight, a party hat, a playing card, and a small bag of confetti. The program included instructions on when to use, don, or throw each item. There was also an opportunity – which many took advantage of – to join in the show’s signature dance, “The Time Warp,” a sort of line dance with instructions for the steps included in the lyrics. Kate Belleman’s choreography was energetic and even included a spunky tap dance for Anne Michelle Forbes, who played the role of Frank ‘N’ Furter groupie Columbia.

The role of Frank ‘N’ Furter was reprised by Jim Morgan, who played the same role at Barksdale Theatre, now part of Virginia Rep. Morgan was fabulous, with flawless makeup, a corset and heels. Levi Meerovich was deliciously menacing – a perfect blend of horror and comedy – as his loyal servant turned arch nemesis, Riff Raff. The Phantoms were played – mostly danced – by Jet Davidson, Michaela Nicole, Havy Nguyen, and Achille Wangam, and the ensemble was completed by Jeffrey Cole as The Narrator, Kaitlyn Tate as the Usherette who introduced the show and Riff Raff’s sister Magenta, and Carlen Kernish who played the unfortunate Eddie who met an early demise as well as the paraplegic Dr. Scott.

The musical originally opened in 1973 in London where it played successfully for over seven years, and the film version, The Rocky Horror Picture Show,  premiered in 1975 and quickly became a midnight-show cult. The book, music, and lyrics are all by Richard O’Brien. The RTP production has musical direction by Kim Fox. The music was pumping, the voices were soaring, although sometimes I could not understand the lyrics because they were screaming or got lost in the music. But at least half the audience seemed to know all the words, so it didn’t matter and certainly didn’t seem to diminish anyone’s enjoyment. “Sweet Transvestite” and “I Can Make You a Man” were standouts led by Frank ‘N’ Furter, and “Touch-A Touch-A Touch Me,” led by Janet in the second act was outstanding, but “The Time Warp” seemed to be the audience’s hands-down favorite.

Sheila Russ’ costumes were campy and fun, and enhanced by Joel Furtick’s hair and make-up, while Frank Foster’s set was simple and utilitarian. Andrew Bonniwell did the lighting, and I received a message that while Joey Luck had originally been slated to do the sound design for ROCKY it was actually done by Artistic Director Lucian Restivo with Shane Barber as the live mixer for every performance.

So, what’s my problem with it? It’s a well-designed and well-executed musical – and I like musicals. It’s popular among fans and fun for “virgins,” but it just isn’t to my taste. I never saw the movie and do not have any plans to see it, but I did see the Firehouse production in 2012 and it still hasn’t grown on me. So, I hope I have been fair in describing what I consider an excellent production – except for those times when I found the lyrics muddled – and offer kudos to the performers for singing and dancing their hearts out, but I’ll never be a part of the fan club. I felt like something of an alien myself.

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

———-

Photo Credits: John MacLellan

ROCKY_0404
Jim Morgan as Frank ‘N’ Furter (center) with Katlyn Tate and Levi Meerovich as Magenta and Riff Raff, along with Achille Wangam, Jet Davidson and Havy Nguyen in Richmond Triangle Players’ production of Richard O’Brien’s “The Rocky Horror Show”, running at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre through Oct 26. All performances are sold out. Photo by John MacLellan.
ROCKY_0293
Kaitlyn Tate and Levi Meerovich as Magenta and Riff Raff in Richmond Triangle Players’ production of Richard O’Brien’s “The Rocky Horror Show”, running at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre through Oct 26. All performances are sold out. Photo by John MacLellan
ROCKY_0160
Luke Newsome and Madeleine Witmer as Brad and Janet in Richmond Triangle Players’ production of Richard O’Brien’s “The Rocky Horror Show”, running at RTP’s Robert B. Moss Theatre through Oct 26. All performances are sold out. Photo by John MacLellan.

 

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KARAR DANCE COMPANY PRESENTS: CIRCADIAN, an evening-length work

019 DOGTOWN PRESENTER’S SERIES: KARAR DANCE COMPANY

A Dance Review by Julinda D. Lewis

At: Dogtown Dance Theatre, 109 W. 15th Street, RVA 23224

Performances: October 18-26, 2019

Ticket Prices: $20 General Admission; $15 Students

Info: (804) 230-8780 or dogtowndancetheatre.com

 

Circadian is a mesmerizing evening-length work for five dancers. The creative offspring of Kara Robertson, Artistic Director of Karar Dance Company, Circadian was inspired by a series of black and white photographs by Fan Ho (1931-2016), an award-winning Chinese photographer, film director, and actor who was known for his mastery of light and shadow. An image of his work entitled Approaching Shadow first caught Robertson’s attention some three years ago, and after much research, and some six months of intensive work with her company of dancers and collaborators, resulted in a 40-minute dance inspired by Fan Ho’s body of work captured in his book, Hong Kong Yesterday. [Hear the choreographer explain how her movement was inspired by the photographs: https://www.facebook.com/KARARDANCECOMPANY/videos/397277210947427/]

Fan Ho photo
Fan Ho image, Approaching Shadow

The first thing that strikes you about Circadian is the space; it is performed in the round, with two rows of seating on each side of the dance space. The second thing you might notice is the light; there are bright lights at each of the four corners of the dance space, and Weston Corey has designed numerous special effects, some quite subtle and some deliberately startling. This four-sided performance space with this moody, atmosphere-changing lighting, creates a world all its own that pulls and lulls the audience so that one loses track of time. A wooden lattice-work frame – the work of Crux Scenica – hangs above the dancers; I was so caught up in their motion and the mood of the lights that both surreptitiously and overtly direct our gaze, as well as by the sometimes hypnotic, sometimes dynamic original score by Ryan Davis that I didn’t notice it until near the end. It came as a total surprise that we had watched 40 minutes of uninterrupted dancing – and that the 5 dancers had been onstage moving for all that time.

Circadian begins with a simple walk. Dressed in simple but elegant two-piece black garments (kudos to designer Damion Bond) with wrap-around pants and cropped athletic tops that remind of yoga, meditation, and other healthy, healing practices, the five navigate the circumference of the space with measured and deliberate steps, articulating each action of the foot. Their arms are not yet engaged as they complete this counterclockwise procession with frequent interruptions of the precise cycle as one dancer then another breaks the formation by changing position, cutting across the space, widening or closing the gap between dancers, or moving into the center for a solo. These diversions only increase the mesmerizing power of the deliberate cycle.

Company dancers David Alexander Deegan, Caroline Echevarria, Amy Mulder, Amy Perkinson, and Haley Wall worked well as an ensemble, taking their cues from one another’s breathing or a fleeting glance, the briefest eye contact and seeming to move from a shared pool of energy. This synergy is most palpable and powerful when the music pauses, seeming to take a breath of its own so that the dancers and audience can experience the power and natural rhythm of silence.

 Gradually the patterns become more complex, the movements engage the arms and the entire body, often using a position from a Fan Ho photograph to initiate a movement phrase or transition from one section of the dance to another. The precision and focused intent of the walking is countered by softer shapes in the center, rounded spines and shoulders, a gentle firmness when they make contact that feels safe and secure yet daring at the same time.

There are spaces for the dancers and the music to breathe, only to continue as if the silence and stillness were natural parts of the cycle, of the circadian rhythm. They end on the floor, face down, as if taking a collective breath. I liked everything about Circadian and it is even more special to see such high caliber work from a small, young, local company. If time permits, I will see Circadian again, and choose a seat on a different side of the room to see if that substantially affects the viewer’s experience of the piece.

Karar Dance Company is a young organization; the company debuted in 2017 with a goal of becoming a collaborative conduit for artistic expression and a commitment to things homegrown. Kara Robertson as well of 4 of her 5 dancers – David Alexander Deegan, Amy Mulder, Amy Perkinson, and Haley Wall – are all graduates of the VCU Department of Dance and Choreography. Caroline Echevarria is also local – a native of Richmond and a graduate of Elon University’s department of Dance Performance & Choreography.

The presentation of Circadian was made possible by Dogtown Dance Theatre’s Presenter’s Series. Now in its fourth year, the Dogtown Presenter’s Series (DPS) annually places the spotlight on an independent artist or Richmond-based organization, producing a two-week series that provides the artist with all the major resources needed, including rehearsal space, technical production, marketing, public relations, and a stipend. The goal of the DPS is to introduce Richmond audiences to choreographers who reflect the rich cultural diversity of the city, and I hope more people in Richmond and the surrounding counties find or make the time to visit the Manchester neighborhood and support our local artists.

Julinda D. Lewis is a dancer, teacher, and writer who was born in Brooklyn, NY and now lives in Eastern Henrico County.

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Photo Credits: Michael Keeling – Karar rehearsal photos; Fan Ho – Approaching Shadow image

 

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